Several miles of Laughlin’s northern Colorado River frontage have been transformed into a recreational paradise offering a trails system with a variety of multi-use walks and hikes. There are fishing piers that cantilever over the Colorado River and a fully appointed day-use park with a state of the art children’s play ground and water spray area with Davis Dam as its backdrop. The Colorado River Heritage Greenway Park and Trails (aka “North Reach”) includes four developed trailheads connected by multi-use desert and river front trails that extend and link the exisiting  Laughlin Riverwalk to a signature pedestrian overpass, which enhances Laughlin’s unique quality of life and its “soft adventure-appeal” while protecting natural and cultural resources on US Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service lands in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

Laughlin’s nearly $35 million project supports the concept of a larger regional trails system linking to the Town’s southern boundaries and even across state lines into Arizona.

The design and construction of the project is administered through Clark County and was funded primarily from the Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act (SNPLMA). The project’s prestigious landscape architecture firm, Riverwalk-famed Rialto Studio, San Antonio, Texas, partnered with VTN Nevada, on the project’s design and engineering.

The North Reach project was created through a long-time partnership between the US Bureau of Reclamation, the National Parks Service and Clark County, Nevada. Support from the Laughlin Chamber of Commerce, the Las Vegas Convention  and Visitor’s Authority, the Laughlin resort hotels and other public and private entities were also instrumental in the development process.

This project plans for fee and non-fee based recreation development on USBR land to be administered by Clark County in a cooperative agreement partnership with the federal agencies. It will provide for responsible, managed development of lands and, at the same time, enhance the users understanding of area history and natural resources. Future commercial and non-commercial uses are anticipated.